Scholarships

The Journalism Department offers several scholarship opportunities to students. Journalism students will receive an email notification when the application period opens and will be able to apply through the Academic Works Scholarship System: https://sfsu.academicworks.com/

TORRI MINTON SCHOLARSHIP FOR ASPIRING JOURNALISTS

To assist SF State students majoring in Journalism with financial need and demonstrated ability to write compelling human-interest stories in the Bay Area. The scholarship is being given by a donor to honor former SF State lecturer and Chronicle Reporter Torri Minton, who died of cancer in August 2004. Minton was 47. Students who took Minton's classes and colleagues who worked with her remember Minton as an effervescent writer who could develop a rapport with just about anyone. A former managing editor described Minton as a stylish and prolific writer who broke several stories.

Kat Anderson Media Worker’s Support Fund for Student Journalists

Kat Anderson Media Worker’s Support Fund for Student Journalists is awarded to students who have financial need and who are interested in reporting on issues affecting women, labor and economic social justice issues, and issues in minority communities. The recipient will receive $1,000. Also, because of this special donation to the department, we have cameras and iPads that can be checked out to students who can’t afford to buy this equipment. Speak to Scot Tucker about using this equipment.

The Otto J. Bos Memorial Scholarship for Excellence in Journalism

The Otto J. Bos Memorial Scholarship for Excellence in Journalism, awards full tuition for full-time students in the academic year taking at least one journalism class each semester. Otto Bos was a 1970 graduate of the department. Following graduation, he became a government and politics reporter at The San Diego Union. In 1977, Otto became press secretary for San Diego Mayor Pete Wilson. He continued to serve Wilson as he later was elected a U.S. senator and then California governor. At the time of his death of a heart attack in 1991, Otto was Gov. Wilson’s director of communications and public affairs.

The Bob Brown Memorial Scholarship

The Bob Brown Memorial Scholarship is awarded to photojournalism students. Robert Brown was an NBC News cameraman. He was killed in Guyana on Nov. 18, 1978 during a visit to the controversial religious sect called the People’s Temple. While there, members of the group shot at Congressman Leo J. Ryan, his aides and several journalists.

The Greg Robinson Memorial Photojournalism Scholarship

The Greg Robinson Photojournalism Scholarship was established in memory of a photographer for the San Francisco Examiner when it was owned by Hearst. Like Bob Brown, Robinson was killed in Guyana in 1978. Applicants must submit a portfolio and completed Scholarship Entry Form. The Friends of Greg Robinson Photojournalism Fund for Supplies was established to disburse a stipend for photographic supplies to the winner of the Greg Robinson Scholarship.

The Stacey Doukas Memorial Scholarship

The Stacey Doukas Memorial Scholarship is awarded to photojournalism students. When available, awards are approximately $1,000 an academic year. Stacey was a student at San Francisco State when her car overturned on a Bay Area freeway and she died. Her family established scholarship to remember her free spirit and love of life.

The John & Douglas Fang Memorial Scholarship

The John & Douglas Fang Memorial Scholarship honors the memory of John Fang, the late publisher of the San Francisco Independent, by providing support, when available, to journalism majors in good academic standing. Applicants are called upon to make a strong case in favor of diversity in journalism, a major concern of Mr. Fang.

The Frank McCulloch Investigative Reporting Scholarship

The Frank McCulloch Investigative Reporting Scholarship offers small grants for students to pursue a reporting investigation. Frank McCulloch was a famed investigative reporter and editor who, in the course of five decades, covered some of the biggest stories that would make history. He exposed connections between politicians and the mafia. When covering Vietnam, he wrote stories that countered official reports about the progress of the war. He spent many years as an editor fighting libel actions and making sure journalists remained protected by the First Amendment. He wrote the first cover story about Thurgood Marshall before he was a Supreme Court Justice and after he made a name for himself in the Brown v. Board of Education trial.